Reflections on our Amazing Trip to Easter Island

EasterIslandSantiagoVacation-117

The day we flew away from Easter Island, I wrote the following journey entry:

“As the Easter Island Guide Book warned me: ‘You will leave Easter Island with more questions than answers.’ This is so true! Due to the small population & size of island, the history of the Rapa Nui has often been seen as a microcosm of all humanity. Today I read 2 Chronicles 33, and I noticed several similarities between the Rapa Nui people & the Israelites: their downfall & rebirth as a nation.

  • Both the Israelites & Rapa Nui were one of the smallest nations in the world.
  • Both nearly became extinct due to their idol worship.
  • Both were rescued from their near demise.

Looking over the island, here are two reflections:

chile_easter_island_aerial_view_islands_landscapes_1680x1050_67795

1. Thoughts on Idolatry

Most contribute the downfall of the Rapa Nui culture to their worship of the stone statutes (called Moai). One guide said it took 2 years and a crew of 20 people to carve only one of these huge stone statues (the biggest is 70 feet high and 270 tons!). And they have counted 887 Moai all around the island – that is a lot of man hours!

ahu-akahangaSince the Rapa Nui lived 1,000 years in isolation, and they believed that all other “islands” of the world had sunken, they thought they were the last survivors on earth. They also believed a divine king would one day return to the island to save them, but to gain his attention, they needed to make bigger and taller Moai. The problem was that the island’s resources could not support the construction of more Moai. They had to cut down more trees to make more Moai, but over time they deforested the entire island. And once the trees were gone, civilization fell into chaos. No wood for fires, fishing boats, farming, or housing. Civil war broke out among the tribes. All the Moai were toppled face down (that’s why most are not standing upright today). Soon after they resorted to cannibalism in order to survive.

Both history & Scripture teaches an important lesson about idolatry: it always leads to destruction. Paul says that behind every idolatrous practice is a demon (1 Cor. 10:20-21), and the end game of the demons is death (John 8:44). In short, idolatry is dangerous for a people’s existence. Where are the Canaanites today? Where are the northern tribes of Israel? We have “Jews” that trace their linage back to Judah, but the idol worshippers of northern Israel were sent into permeant exile. Where are the Mochians or the Chimus? If you come visit me in Trujillo, Peru, I can show your their temples in ruin.

EasterIslandSantiagoVacation-194There is a parallel between Manasseh’s son, Amon, and the children of the Rapa Nui. Amon brought out his daddy’s idols for worship; which led to his quick downfall (2 Chron. 33:21-25). It is no secret; the idols of Rapa Nui’s past are the main reason why tourists come to the island today. And tourism is the main industry of the Rapa Nui. So the BIG QUESTION for the Rapa Nui is: Will they bring out the Moai as idols and worship them like Amon worshipped his father’s idols? If so, God might just let capitalistic consumerism over take their little island. Can Easter Island support the exploitive power of international hotel chains, tons of tourists and major industry turning their island into a remote Disney Land? Although the very Moai were crafted to provide protection & prosperity from the outside forces (thus most of them face inland), will these stone statues once again be their demise? Or will the 5,700 remanent of Rapa Nui survive like the faithful Jews, and turned to God and worshipped Him alone? These are the questions the Rapa Nui youth face today.

2. Thoughts on Grace

I am moved by how God is so gracious. The Chronicler adds material that is not recorded in Book of Kings: Manasseh repents in exile. The Assyrians literally took him into exile with hooks; he was brought very low. Perhaps when the Rapa Nui dwindled from 10,000 to 111, a chief repented of his ways, was converted by hearing the gospel from a Christian missionary, God was greatly moved (as with Manasseh), and restored a people from a near destruction. I have no clue if this ever happened, but I would not be surprised something like this is true. How else did the three crosses get placed on one of the main hills that overlooks the village of Hanga Roa, the very place where they were exiled on their own island for about 70 years (from the annexing of Chile in 1888 to their release in 1966).

The main point is that God is more moved by repentance than by rebellion. Yes, God punishes the wicked, even Judean kings who burned their children on a flaming altar or people who eat each other; however He als restores anyone who repents of their ways and turns to Him for forgiveness. Destruction is for the rebellious, but relief is for those who repent. We know that Manasseh truly repented because he issued many reforms; and he was the worst of the kings, even worse than wicked Ahab! Yet God loves to forgive. He even brought Manasseh back to Jerusalem from exile and restored him as king. What amazing grace! Perhaps that is why we see the Rapa Nui resurge today.”

EasterIslandSantiagoVacation-220

Christ, the Church & The Lego Movie

Www indiewire

Yesterday, I took my 4 daughters, along with 10 other  kids, to see The Lego Movie. Despite that it was dubbed in Spanish, I literally laughed the entire time. I woke up this morning feeling like Emmet. Even that cute yet annoying tune buzzed through my brain: “Everything is awesome!” (If you watched it, don’t lie – you had the same experience!)

WARNING: Spoilers Ahead!

[If you haven’t seen the movie yet, come back latter to read this entry.]

OK, I’m a pastor, and I admit that the entire meta-narrative isn’t exactly a consistent Biblical worldview (i.e. the prophesy is true – there is a chosen one!). But I’m fine with it, because this movie is told from a kid’s perspective. Just as if I would be gracious to my 6 year-old’s imaginary world of My Little Ponies & Littlest Pet Shop, so I will not point out all the gaps. Rather, let me share with you several awesome themes of redemption that I found:

1. We all have a special role to play on God’s team

What is refreshing about The Lego Movie is that it does not just celebrate the repetitive theme that “everyone is special” but places our specialness in a community context. The second line to the theme song (“…everything is cool when you’re part of a team”) actually interprets what the movie means by awesome.  As Cuidon of Christianity Today says: “The Lego Movie proposes that our different roles in the larger story make each of us totally necessary and special, even if we don’t all look and act the same.” One can easily see how the all the members of a local church are very special because all are very needed to make disciples and be salt and light in the world.

2. We all have a creative role to play on God’s team

The Lego Movie also connects our collective awesomeness to our creativity. I agree with Gray Ewing, that we are all builders that image the Master Architects creativity in making a better world. “In creation,” Ewing states, “God has basically given us a bunch of colorful blocks and told us to go play with them in meaningful ways.” Yes, we do have dominion over the earth (Gen. 1:28), but not in an oppressive way like President Business, but in a caring way like Emmet and his motley crew of master builders. We make the world more awesome through innovation, creativity, and many times through improvisation.

[Side note: Richard Bauckham does a brilliant job in his book The Bible & Ecology, of making a biblical case that the cultural mandate is a call for creative care of the earth, rather than cruel exploitation of the earth as some Christians in the past have interpreted.]

3. We all have to follow the rules on God’s team

A major turning point in the movie is when Emmet improvises a speech to the other master builders. He tells them how they can enter the unscalable, impenetrable Office Building. It will not be by building a bat mobile, a pirate ship, or a rainbow train. Rather, Emmet surprises them all and says that following instructions is the most subversive thing they can do! “No one will expect it!” Another thing I loved about The Lego Movie is that they don’t portray rule following as boring and dumb, but rather as the most counter-cultural strategy against President Business. To be on an effective team, yes, we have to follow the rules, especially the rules our Master Builder tells us in the blue prints of Scripture.

4. Even the most unlikely people are chosen to be on God’s team

Right when President Business is about to glue Emmet, all seems to be lost! Yet Emmet improvises again (something he seems to be growing in) and says he has a secret weapon. This spikes President Business’ curiosity and asks, “What is it?” “Our hands,” replies Emmet (If the dialogue isn’t exactly right, I did watch it in Spanish!). What Emmet says next is the most surprising moment of the movie, he tells the undeserving, cruel President Business that he too is special, that he is the chosen one, and the most gifted master builder he knows! Although Morgan Freeman (Vitruvius) already said that had made up prophecy about the chosen-one, what Emmet says still communicates a powerful point: electing love changes even our enemies’ hearts. Emmet chose to love the villain. As Emmet lavishes his love on President Business, his perpetual angry face melts away into wonder.

Perhaps when President Business becomes part of the team is the most powerful gospel moment in the movie. The good news is that the Divine Architect is real and His prophecy is true. God does have a Chosen One and He is the real hero of the story.  His death on the cross looked more idiotic and unpractical than Emmet’s double-decker couch (which interestingly saves them all). The cross was foolishness to the Greeks and a stumbling block to the Jews. We too are like President Business, and Jesus’ counter-intuitive act of love melts our hearts. “While we were enemies, we were reconciled to God by the death of his Son” (Romans 5:10).

Christians, lets me honest. Look around. Not only are many of us as bizarre as Uni-Kitty, as simple as Emmet, as narcissistic as Batman, but we are also as mean as President Business. We do not deserve to be on the team. And that is precisely what makes election so beautiful, so touching. Although we are the most unlikely people to be on God’s team, He has chosen us to do some awesome things. So let’s keep extending the hand like Emmet and work together as God’s unlikely team, because we know that one day everything will be completely awesome!

What did I miss? What other themes did you you see?

Most Listened to Music of 2013

Continuing this mini-series of “best-of 2013”, here is our family’s favorite, most-listened to music of this past year.

Allen’s Favorite Music

 

1. Gungor

When I first heard Gungor, it was love and first listen! They are most known for their song Beautiful Things, which we used for our family update. Gungor is made up of eclectic styles, beautiful melodies, and thoughtful Christian lyrics. Most morning I wake up to Brother Moongive it a listen:

2. Bastille

I recently stumbled upon the Britt band, Bastille. I love their 80 electric sound with Queen-like harmonies and Muse-like melody lines. There is not a bad track on their new album, Bad Blood. I look forward to listening to the tribal song, Pompeii, on Easter Island!

3. Liquid Mind

Since my study is at my house, I’m always looking for ways to cancel the noise of squealing girls playing in the rooms. However, I can’t just listen to any music with rhythm, lyrics, or dynamics. That’s why Liquid Mind perfectly fits the bill: peaceful, ambient, rhythmless sounds that helps me focus while studying.

Sandi’s Favorite Songs

1. Little Talks by Of Monsters & Men

2. I Will Wait by Mumford & Sons

3. Un Día de Sol by Los Claxons

A poppy song that was free on iTunes this past year. Click on the album cover below to here this fun song.

Los_Claxons-Un_Dia_De_Sol-Frontal

Kids Favorites Music

1. Cimorelli

Last year we discovered a 6 sister singing group called, Cimorelli. Our 4 daughters can identify and love singing their songs. Here is one of their favorites, Made in America.

2. The Trinity Band

Our friend from the Netherlands, Albert den Oudsten, introduced us to a Dutch Christian group called The Trinity Band. What is unique about these guys, is that several of the brothers grew up in Peru and learned many of the same songs we sing in church. Here is their funnest song, Fiesta Celestial (Heavenly Party) – our favorite song for camp this year.

3. Britt Nicole

Our girls have also enjoyed Britt Nicole. Here is her most popular track, Gold.

What are some of your favorite music groups and songs from 2013?